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Re: Writing Little Endian Binary Data (Was: Long in the...)



Thanks,

I hadden't thought about checking the NIO classes.


Rob

On Thu, 2003-04-10 at 11:32, Gregory Pierce wrote:
> Yeah, its as good as any. It covers the information in good enough 
> detail that you could figure out some of the stuff they kinda skim 
> over. I've been waiting for better NIO books for a while now since NIO 
> is truly the future of highly scalable Java server solutions.
> 
> On Thursday, April 10, 2003, at 11:26  AM, Scott P. Smith wrote:
> 
> > That sounds like the way to go, if you use JDK 1.4.  I was actually 
> > about to
> > buy the O'Reilly NIO book yesterday on Amazon, but did not complete the
> > transaction.  I think I will today.  I've been meaning to look at it.
> >
> > I assume that's as good a book as any?
> >
> > Scott
> >
> >
> > ----- Original Message -----
> > From: "Gregory Pierce" <gregorypierce@mac.com>
> > To: "Atlanta Java Users Group" <ajug-members@ajug.org>
> > Sent: Thursday, April 10, 2003 11:16 AM
> > Subject: Re: Writing Little Endian Binary Data (Was: Long in the...)
> >
> >
> >> Just as an observation, I have been doing something similar - only
> >> using the ByteBuffer classes in NIO and just changing the byteorder to
> >> whatever order I needed the data in. Seemed to be easier and worked
> >> cleanly with the Channel API in 1.4+.
> >>
> >> On Thursday, April 10, 2003, at 08:24  AM, Scott P. Smith wrote:
> >>
> >>> Rob,
> >>>
> >>> Someone mentioned the Apache POI project earlier.  The
> >>> org.apache.poi.util
> >>> package in that project has what you need, I think.  That project has
> >>> do to
> >>> all the kind of stuff you are doing, so the code is there somewhere.
> >>> Look at
> >>> the org.apache.poi.util.LittleEndian class.  It reads (and writes)
> >>> different
> >>> primitive data types from (to) a byte array.  Of course, you would 
> >>> use
> >>> this
> >>> class in combination with a java.io.BufferedInputStream and/or a
> >>> java.io.BufferedOutputStream.
> >>>
> >>> Scott Smith
> >>>
> >>> ----- Original Message -----
> >>> From: "Rob Rutherford" <rrutherford@dglenn.com>
> >>> To: "Atlanta Java Users Group" <ajug-members@ajug.org>
> >>> Sent: Wednesday, April 09, 2003 10:47 PM
> >>> Subject: Re: Looking for Long Tooth...
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>>
> >>>> Hello all,
> >>>>
> >>>> I'm new to AJUG, and fairly new to the Atlanta area, (actually
> >>>> Columbus), and I've been lurking on the list for the past couple of
> >>>> months.  This topic strikes me as highly relavant to what I'm doing
> >>>> right now.
> >>>>
> >>>> I have a binary formatted file consisting of unsigned binary data
> >>>> types,
> >>>> (bytes through longs) with mixed big endian and little endian 
> >>>> fields.
> >>>> Does anybody have any suggestions for handeling such a beast?
> >>>>
> >>>>
> >>>> Thanks
> >>>> Rob Rutherford
> >>>>
> >>>>
> >>>>
> >>>> On Wed, 2003-04-09 at 09:31, Scott P. Smith wrote:
> >>>>
> >>>>> * Non-Java Binary File I/O - When working with binary files that 
> >>>>> were
> >>>>> created in C, C++, etc. you will see a lot of use of things like
> >>> unsigned
> >>>>> 16, and 32 bit values. Since Java doesn't support these, you have 
> >>>>> to
> >>>>> use
> >>>>> bitwise operators to put the uint16 into a Java int32. And vise
> >>>>> versa.
> >>>>>
> >>>>
> >>>>
> >>>>
> >>>
> >>
> >>
> >
>