Spring Data

Spring Data

August 21, 2012

This event will jointly held with Atlanta Spring Users Group.

This session starts with a high-level look at all that the Spring Data project has to offer. Then we’ll dive deeper into a few select Spring Data modules, including Spring Data Neo4j, Spring Data MongoDB, Spring Data Redis, Spring Data JPA, and Spring Data JDBC Extensions

In recent years, there has been a renewed interest in how data is stored. Although RDBMS has long been treated as a one-size-fits-all solution for data storage, a new breed of datastores has arrived to offer a best-fit solution. Key-value stores, column stores, document stores, graph databases, as well as the traditional relational database are options to consider.

With these new data storage options come new and different ways of interacting with data. Even though all of these data storage options offer Java APIs, they are widely different from each other and the learning curve can be quite steep. Even if you understand the concepts and benefits of each database type, there’s still the huge barrier of understanding how to work with each database’s individual API.

Spring Data is a project that makes it easier to build Spring-powered applications that use new data, offering a reasonably consistent programming model regardless of which type of database you choose. In addition to supporting the new “NoSQL” databases such as document and graph databases, Spring Data also greatly simplifies working with RDBMS-oriented datastores using JPA.

About the Speaker

Craig Walls

Craig Walls has been professionally developing software for almost 18 years (and longer than that for the pure geekiness of it). He is a senior engineer with SpringSource as the Spring Social project lead and is the author of Spring in Action and XDoclet in Action (both published by Manning) and Modular Java (published by Pragmatic Bookshelf). He’s a zealous promoter of the Spring Framework, speaking frequently at local user groups and conferences and writing about Spring and OSGi on his blog. When he’s not slinging code, Craig spends as much time as he can with his wife, two daughters, 4 birds and 3 dogs.

Posted in Meetings
AJUG Meetup

Building and Deploying 12 Factor Apps in Scala and Java

April 18, 2017

The twelve-factor app is a modern methodology for building software-as-a-service apps:

• Use declarative formats for setup automation, to minimise time and cost for new developers joining the project.

• Have a clean contract with the underlying operating system, offering maximum portability between execution environments.

• Are suitable for deployment on modern cloud platforms, obviating the need for servers and systems administration.

• Minimise divergence between development and production, enabling continuous deployment for maximum agility.

• And can scale up without significant changes to tooling, architecture, or development practices.

We will build a RESTful web service in Java and deploy the app to CloudFoundry. We will go over how to build a cloud manifest, how to keep our database credentials and application configuration outside of our code by using user-provided services and go over what it takes to build a 12 Factor application in the cloud. This presentation will be heavy on code and light on slides!

Location:


Roam Dunwoody

1155 Mount Vernon Highway NE
Atlanta, GA 30338 (map)

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