What is an Architect, and How Do I Become One? A discussion on Architects and Architecture.

What is an Architect, and How Do I Become One? A discussion on Architects and Architecture.

April, 17 2012

Is there a real difference between a Senior Developer and an Architect? And how do Developers become Architects? Do you just have to be even better at delivering software, or are there other skills to learn? Given that this talk is being hosted by two members of the International Association of Software Architects, you can bet that we believe there is a difference and there is a difference in skill sets. If you’re interested in going deeper into the topic and learning more, please joins us for an interactive session.

About the Speakers

David A. Lane

David A. Lane is a V.P. and Senior Architect within Architect within SunTrust Bank’s Enterprise Architecture Practice focusing on Corporate Systems – back end systems which support all that it takes to run a bank. Areas such as Risk, Compliance, Audit, Finance, HR, Marketing and related systems. He has been with SunTrust since 1998 serving in many capacities from Developer, SME, PM, System Admin to Solution Architect. Prior to joining SunTrust I worked as a developer and network admin for various Novell, Microsoft and Unix networks. Have overseen small and large projects involving J2EE, .NET, mainframe and vended solutions. I am also a certified Project Management Professional (PMP). Served serve on the Global IASA Board of Education volunteering on both the Architect Training (ATC) and Bylaws Committees which worked to define the Architecture profession along with accompanying IASA training curriculum and certifications. Currently I am one of the founding members of the IASA Atlanta Chapter and have served on its board since its official inception over four years ago (having served in every officer position).

Burk Hufnagel

Burk Hufnagel is a Solution architect with Research In Motion, working with Business, Development, Operations, and QA teams, to deliver better software faster. Burk is currently on the Board of Directors for AJUG and the Atlanta chapter of the International Association of Software Architects. Like David, he is a founding member of the chapter and has been on the Board since it began.
Burk is certified by Sun as a Java Programmer, Developer, and JEE 5 Enterprise Architect, and a contributing author to the O’Reilly books “97 Things Every Programmer Should Know” and “97 Things Every Software Architect Should Know”. In 2010, Burk was voted a JavaOne Rock Star for his talk on User Experience Anti-Patterns.

Posted in Meetings
AJUG Meetup

Data Microservices with Spring Cloud Stream, Task, and Data Flow

Tuesday, July 19, 2016

Microservice based architectures are not just for distributed web applications! They are also a powerful approach for creating distributed stream and batch processing.

Spring Cloud Data Flow enables you to create and orchestrate standalone executable applications that communicate over messaging middleware such as Kafka and RabbitMQ that when run together, form a distributed stream processing application. It also allows users to create and orchestrate short lived microservices like batch jobs or boot applications that perform a task and then terminate when complete.

This allows you to scale, version and operationalize stream processing and task applications following microservice based patterns and practices on a variety of runtime platforms such as Cloud Foundry, Apache YARN and others.

Location:


Holiday Inn Atlanta-Perimeter/Dunwoody

4386 Chamblee Dunwoody Road,
Atlanta, GA (map)

AJUG Tweets

Follow @atlantajug on twitter.

Recent Jobs