MessageDrivenArchitectureWithSpring

November 16, 2010 @ 7:00pm – Message-Driven Architecture with the Spring Platform

Description

This presentation will provide a comprehensive overview of Spring’s support for eventing, messaging, scheduling, and batch processing. You will learn how these features provide a platform for message-driven architecture. Examples will include integration with JMS, AMQP, Web Services, email, instant messaging and more. You will also learn about Spring’s support for Hohpe and Woolf’s Enterprise Integration Patterns. This will include demos of several basic patterns such as Messaging Gateway, Message Transformer, and Message Router, as well as composite patterns such as Control Bus, Claim Check, and Scatter/Gather using Splitters and Aggregators. The examples will also cover different options for adding custom integration logic within the configuration-driven context. Those options include not only POJOs, but also Spring 3.0’s Expression Language and Groovy scripts.

Speaker

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Mark Fisher is an engineer within the SpringSource division of VMware and lead of the the Spring Integration team. He is also a committer on the core Spring Framework as well as the Spring AMQP and Spring BlazeDS Integration projects. In addition to his role as an engineer, Mark spends a significant amount of time working with customers as a consultant and trainer. The focus of such engagements is primarily in the realm of enterprise integration, messaging, and event-driven applications.

Mark is a frequent speaker at conferences and user groups in North America and Europe, and along with other Spring Integration committers, he is an author of the forthcoming book, “Spring Integration in Action”, to be published by Manning.

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AJUG Meetup

Developing scalable, concurrent + fault-tolerant applications with Akka Actors

Tuesday, November 18, 2014

This presentation will cover the use of Akka Actors as a method of developing highly-scalable systems in a highly fault-tolerant manner. It will begin with a look at the Akka Actors and their asynchronous, message-passing, share-nothing nature. Next, we will look at some of the flexible options available to developers using Akka, such as using the Akka Event-Bus for inter-Actor communication, Persistent Channel Communication, PArent-Child relationships, and EventSourcing with Akka. Lastly, a full-featured example will illustrate how we can leverage the previous concepts to develop a CQRS-with-EventSourcing high-volume enterprise-class application with minimal effort. Although Akka is built on Scala, the examples presented here will be in Java (this is AJUG, right?)

Location:


Holiday Inn Atlanta-Perimeter/Dunwoody

4386 Chamblee Dunwoody Road,
Atlanta, GA (map)

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